In The Focus

We say goodbye to our exhibition Perceptions 3.-evolution- with “Blue Room” by Ákos Esse Bánki. The greatest honour of the large canvas is its movement, owing to the playfulness of the perspective. We can see a room dreamed in blue, its parts were demolished by the artist’s fantasy, to rebuild it with constructive elements. The objects appear with scetchy lines, just as the planes of the space. These drawn objects seem extentionless. Also these lines are not just drwing forms, but also determine the experience of the perspective, they are leading are eyes mainly into the center of the picture. This is the point where the painting thickens, and the point where the two parts of the artwork separate, which is a hardly noticable, but an important momentum. In experiancing the perspectivity of space the variety of colours have a great role, especially the streaming of paint by the lines, and the dark shades of blue. Ákos Esse Bánki treats the theme of the exhibition, evolution, in a special way, he takes it as a personal, inner process. We can observe the development of the picture and its phases on his cavas “Blue Room”, from interpreting the physical world to effacing the paint.

written by: Zsófi Máté
photo: misi

 

Kek szoba (130x340 cm, olaj, vaszon, 2015)_net_eng

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Ákos Esse Bánki: Blue Room (130×340 cm, oil on canvas, 2015)

In The Focus

György Szabó, Munkácsy-prize winner sculptor is featuring Perceptions 3. -evolutio- with four artworks. I consider „The magician’s house” as starting point, because it’s forms and motives are maintained by the other exhibited works, „Tumbleweed”, „Sunkey”, and „Origin” too. „The magician’s house” gives a mythical experience of space and time. The buliding-like scpulture is build from irregular geometrical forms and constructive elements. It is not held together by physical disciples, but an inner, not wordly logic. Movement of the surface happens not just because of the technique, but also and mostly because of the shapes, hollows, various materiality here. This is also perceptible on „Tumbleweed”, on which the contructive forms are in constant motion, making for the sculpture’s inside, empty pole. This emptiness, hiatus is turned into sculptural space by György Szabó in the case of „Origin” The regular orb’s surface is covered with symbols in a repetitive rythm, which expands the artwork, as if the symbols were emanating from the centre’s empty space. Next to „Origin” stands an other piece of The „Magical orb” series, the luminary-like „Sunkey”. The motives on the raw, illuminating surface of the artwork are like a map to an imaginary galaxy. All these sculptures belong to the same magical universe, and György Szabó is the magician, who keeps every secret symbol and hidden space in motion.

 

written by: Zsófi Máté

photo: misi

 

 

 

A magus haza_kicsi_eng

In The Focus

„In Quarantine” by Mózes Incze was made for the thematic exhibition, Perceptions 3 – evolitio – . The artwork reflects on the roots of the human race, and on the close relationship between human and animal. On the picture there is a chimpanzee, who’s sitting comfortabely in an armchair with srtaight back. His attitude emphasizes his human strains. This could be the reason why he looks threatening to us. In researching the process of evolution, there is always the demand, to alienate ourselves from our animal progenitors. Our state of development rests on the differences, we separate ourselves from the class of monkeys. This portray of a chimpanzee by Mózes Incze obliterates thos differences. The painter sets the animal in the middle of the picture, as if it was a repesentative specimen to unveile the human race. He even surrounds it with a typical motive of his painting, a band. So the monkey is not in a cage, but it is under lock and key. From the dark background hands are leaning to the animal, wearing a pair of green gloves. The key of „In Quarantine” is how we describe the relationship between the monkey and the gloves. My interpretation calls the great philosopher, Walter Benjamin as help. According to him, touching an animal is a dangerous thing, because we can recognize ourselves in them. We have to keep our caveman-selves in secret, hide it, for example with a pair of gloves, which keep us out of touch with animals. But what if this gloves are made of leather? Aren’t we wearing a piece of what we want to desperately be released? On the left side of „In Quarantine” there is a little locked box. From this detail the whole painting can be interpreted as a box, that we use to hide, quarantine our caveman-selves. But is this something to be ashamed of? How does the whole problem look like in the opinion of an animal? The monkey of the painting may would use Nietzsche’s words: „An animal which could speak said: Humanity is a prejudice of which we animals at least are free.”

 

written by: Zsófi Máté
photo: misi

 

Karantenban (100x110 cm, olaj, vaszon, 2015) kicsi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Mózes Incze: In Quarantine (100×110 cm, oil on canvas, 2015)

In The Focus

In „Parallel Lights” series by Tamás Hencze bright colors are playing an important role. Rousing yellows and blues are getting unusually large space on the pictures. I’ve choosen „Parallel Lights XVII” to write about, which is operating instead of these colors with black, grey and white. „Parallel Lights XVII” is closen to itself, identical to itself, both as a picture and as philosophy. The grey and black bands of the frame-like formation wake the sense of symmetry, which is only thickend by the gestures leaning to eachother. Behind these colors are shining the white lights, tending on a regular path, then breaking in the space beyond the formation. They do not pass the borders of the painting, the fund and the end is the artwork itself. Tamás Hencze likes emptiness. Gives a form, a rythm for emptiness. He’s ordering it in the middle of „Paralell Lights XVII”. This bare whiteness has no space or body, though it fills u pour eyes. Looking at this painting by Hencze is like when we’re staring in the blindening Sun, and for a moment we can only see empty, white light, with vibrating colorful forms.

photo: Art.Salon : Társalgó Galéria (misi)
written by: Zsófi Máté
Parallel Lights XVII. (150x100cm, oil on canvas, 2014)

 

hencze_eng

In The Focus

„Time Capsule” by Attila Rajcsók was exhibited in Paris for the first time, and it continues the form world of the artist’s eariler works. For Rajcsók it is very important to demolish, rebuild and interpret the organic forms on the base of the elements of nature. That way the artist and the viewer also have the possibility to look into the inner structure of natural harmony. „Time Capsule” is following this disciple, but despite recreating nature, abstraction is in the foreground, making the artwork futuristic, alienated from real space and time. Its unique structure is due to streaking of the steel straps, because while the sculpture is in course of construction, the inchoate form is transforming, which is terminating with the loop-like connection of the straps. Though the scuplture is terminated only in a material meaning. The artwork by Attila Rajcsók has on one hand an exciting, open inner space. The outside sterile, raw steel gets here the colour of red, which results some kind of an inner ignition, an almost touchable tension, as if the scuplure could turn outside itself in any moment. On the other hand, it is an open arwork, because it is using the viewer’s fantasy, motivatates them to move and shape the sculpture. This sense is only amplified by the position of the artwork. It is almost levitating, barely touching the postament, seems like the temporary balance could capsize anytime. But all this quasi-eventuality is the part of a well planned conception. „Time Capsule” has an incerdible space oranizing power, but the real professional success, is that Attila Rajcsók is building into the constuction all the invisible forms and spaces, which are brought to life by the power of mind.

photo: Mihály Borsos (misi)
written by: Zsófi Máté

Idokapszula (143x84x85 cm, festett, hegesztett acel, 2015)_eng

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Time Capsule (143x84x85 cm, painted, welded steel, 2015)

In The Focus

On “Memory of Poland” by István Csík we can see a cityscape build of geometrical shapes. Buildings, streets appear in a thickend form, alike to expressionism. The spectacle is unequivocally not the copy of reality, but an idividual perspective, the relationship between sense and the real world. “Walking in the city” by Michel de Certeau says, that the city is a text, which is read and written by the voyeur at same time. This means, that the picture of the city is formed by the subject from what is given. This way the subject thickens, obscures, highlights, creates symbols, so in the and only what catches the eye become visible. For example, only one buliding can symbolise a whole district. This leads us to the artwork by István Csík. In the foreground of the picture, there is a figure, which is rung the whole space of the painting, though the contructive elements lead us to the background. The size of the building constructions and the woman are nearly the same. This shifted scale means the importance of the figure, so it becomes the main motive of the memory, the symbol of the city. Gracefulness of the woman, her elegance given by light colours awakens the sense of pureness. This clearness tipyfies the whole picture. With the pale shades, white lights István Csík is composing clear thoughts, clean emotions. Although behind the freshness of the artwork is hiding the dark side of memories. We select them, euphemise the past and its persons, we place the events of our lives to a changing narrative. The woman on “Memory of Poland” has no face, and her body almost fades into her environment. We could say it is a meagre memory, or in fact untrue. But The painting by István Csík says just the very opposite. A memory never true or untrue, but it is ours. Much as it is changeable, stays unquestionable forever.

 

photo: Mihály Borsos (misi)

written by: Zsófi Máté

Lengyelorszagi emlek (65x68 cm, olaj, farost, 2014)_eng

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memory of Poland (65x68cm, oil on wood, 2014)

In The Focus

“Once risen up to the sky, the star/of night river’s not worth much.”- said Attila József, referring to the fact, that art can not perfectly imitate reality, but this is not the aim of it at all. I feel this thought in “Star Projections” by István Csík. The substrate of the artwork is given by space ordering power of constructive formations, but in the center stays the form of circle, which is unlikely in the painting of István Csík. The importance of these shows their colors, which are lightening between the dark shades of painting, avoiding the often used light colors. “Star Projections” tells about in it’s every detail, how the artist, people are related to the universe, which is surrounding and transcending us. István Csík represents the stars in a secure, structured frame within the picture. These gesture can refer to how human beings want from the start of their history recognise and possess the always unreachable transcend world. But in the end, every science and art form has to admit: what we can reach, recognise, is a picture we formed for ourselves, for the scale of human intellect, a projection only. This is what the space outside of the inner frame on the picture tells about. It shows the threatening, deep, thick, formless, dark material, which is the unkown part of our world. “Star Projections” by István Csík revolves to more planes, these symbolize more mental planes. The question of the painting stays open: can we strictly separate these planes? In my opinion, master Csík is showing with this special artwork, that the aforesaid mental planes (just as the planes of the picture’s space) can only exist through each other.

photo: misi
written by: Zsófi Máté

Csillagvetuletek (170x115 cm, olaj, farost, 2009)_eng

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Star Projections (170×115 cm, oil on wood, 2009)

In The Focus

From the title of „Sky, Mount, Water” by István Csík we could think of a traditional landscape. But the master awarded with Munkácsy-prize doesn’t want to represent nature, but to explore a deeper sturcture with the resource of abstraction. „Sky, Mount, Water” is in fact deconstruction, reinterpreting of the named elements of nature. As the result of this process a concentrarte of nature becomes visible on the canvas. The order of the space in the picture is ruled by a horizontal and a vertical red and white stripe, which are crossing eachother, dividing four equal parts of the painting. If we are are observing these sections separately, it turns out, that we find in each of them a form, color a motive, which recalls sky, mount and water. Each of these four parts have indipendent inner order, but they are also in connection. István Csík fills the elements of abtraction with refined shades, while the tender brushwork enacts the forms to natural surfaces. The similar forms- though they are distant on the picture- have the similar world of colors. The viewers can imagine, that they put together these similar forms, so the pieces of the puzzle eject a traditional landscape. But after this imagination, the pieces tear again, and then we recognize the real structure, de given order on „Sky, Mount, Water” by István Csík. In my opinion this painting is a main work of the consecvent life work, which is the concentrate of the interrelation of nature-representation and abstraction.

 

written by: Zsófi Máté
photo: misi

 

Eg, hegy, viz (175x126 cm, olaj, vaszon, 2010)_eng

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Sky, Mount, Water (175×126 cm, oil on canvas, 2010)

In The Focus

„Time Twine” by Attila Rajcsók and PAF is the connection of two artists, two art forms, two minds, in addition the objective effect of clear artistic humility. This takes openness of the artists, and also of the artwork itself. To Attila Rajcsók space-organizing of sculpture, and the question of balance is important. Welded steel straps of „Time Twine” embrace to eachother like they were a living, moving, pulsing organism, despite their stern material. The motive of eventuality on the clean, sterile surface of the sculpture appears only at the meeting point of the stratificating straps. This tiny detail has its own-from the viewpoint of the whole sculpture secondary-rythm, which could serve as the starting point of PAF’s work. „Time Twine” is completed by painted gestures. PAF vindicates the strong colors and the conscious gestures of his painting in a given dimension of form. Stratification of paint, the facture modificates the surface of the sculpture, and the variety of colors, varying of dark and plain gradations give a new rythm to the inner space of the sculpture. In the exhibition the postament with the sculpture on it stands on hangings painted by PAF. This installation is the counterpoint of the gestures on the artwork, which are settling of emotions. This means that they are carriers of underlying content, while the hangings could be defined as action painting, where the creatice process is more important az the message. It is significant to pin down, that none of the artists want to rule „Time Twine”. On the contrary, the artistic world of Rajcsók and PAF open themselves to eachother, honor eachother, adapt to eachother without losing their freedom. In this wise they twine in absolute harmony in an unique artwork.

 

written by: Zsófi Máté

photo: misi

 

 

Idofonat_eng

In The Focus

„Process” by Mózes Incze is a snapshot. We don’t know anything about the activity happening on the picture. What we see is an endless, mute moment. A man stressing his clothes on himself is leaning his arm into an incorporeal shade. He’s holding a feather with gentle hand position above a sailing loop, which is surrounded by powers in vibrant colors. The man’s face is calm and confident, only his hand, grabbing his own shirt convulsively, tells about his inside tension. He knows the fact, that he is just about to make an important decision. The thick silence, which defines the whole painting by Mózes Incze, is impacting the figure’s inner world. In this process he’s becoming speechless, introverted, as he’s concentrating to only one tiny motion. Slipping the feather would may not cause any change in the world of the painting, and the world of the man, buti t could possibly fall into an other dimension through the loop. Anyway, the feather is somehow the part of the figure. Anything happens to it, it also happens to it’s owner. Just as our actions- which could be interpreted as the projection of ourselves- are reacting to us by necessity. Under the hands of Mózes Incze the limits between external and internal are washed away. Every element of the paintg could be understood as the realization of the precesses happening inside the man. „Process” is a pure dimension, in which decisions, actions and their effects become visible.
photo: misi
written by: Zsófi Máté

 

Folyamat (100x140 cm, olaj, vaszon, 2014)_eng

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Process (100×140 cm, oil on canvas, 2014)

In The Focus

“Prototype” by Mózes Incze represents a transition state, an intermediate substantial. The two sides of the figure’s body on the picture have the attributes of two different spheres. A white shirt is hanging from left shoulder, which can be understood as the symbol of life in this world, work and conventions. On the naked body’s right side, wanting to be released from the shirt, we can see a particular construction. A mechanical angelwing, which is not the organic part of the body. Despite it is an imitation, carries the opportunity of freedom and salvation. Just as the space opening behind the figure, it’s vibrant blue has the feeling, that the tanscend world is available. Mózes Incze vindicates a tense balance between the sphere of human and the shepre above human. The stern, mechanic swithes and wires, and that the figure is holdong his hand like Christ on the cross, his golden skin do not overwrite, but somehowe they supplement eachother on the picture. This is the balance of the composition, which can’t erase the mental incompatibility. It doesn’t want to. Is it possibile to exist is two different worlds at the same time, or get redemption with the help of modern technique? This is the experiment, that is performed by “Prototype” by Mózes Incze.

 

photo: misi

written by: Zsófi Máté

 

Prototipus (100x140 cm, olaj, vaszon, 2014)_eng

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prototype (100×140 cm, oil on canvas, 2014)

In The Focus

“Floors Castle – Scotland” by László Borbély is not only an image of a real building. The artist is not representing reality, he is interested in mixing of different visions, and showing them at the same time. In the way of representation is experiential, the picture is ruled by the painter’s own perspective. The primarity of personal impressions is showing up by the elements, which move the painting to idyll from reality, as the warm colors of the castle, and the bland lights. Although the real uniqueness of László Borbély’s painting is the technique he builds the picture with. “Floors Castle – Scotland” is like as we were looking through a prism to the view. The building and it’s environment becomes an unified spectacle through fusion of seperate geometrical forms. These forms are located under the structure of the building on the painting, they are actually the extension of the architectural space. That is, how “Floors Castle – Scotland” reinterprets reality, with different methods, on different levels.

 

written by: Zsófi Máté

photo: misi

 

 

Floors kastely (Skocia) (60x110 cm, olaj, vaszon, 2012)_eng

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Floors Castle (Scotland) (60x110cm, oil on canvas, 2012)

In The Focus

“Cradle” by Attila Rajcsók offers many opportunities of interpretation to the viewer. The sterile, laminatedly welded, snowhite steel visualizes a process. As if in front of our eyes a core would sprout, petals of a flower would unfold, an animel would slip of it’s shell, or a human being would come to life. “Cradle” represents the slow process of birth, and at the same time, the very reverse of it. What seems opening, unfolding at the first glimpse, also could be the act of closing, passing away in the case of this sculpture. The neutral white color also makes undefinable, that what we see is the unfolding or the locking of the artwork. It seems like “Cradle” is a liminality, an incarnated moment, when the insight to the inner parts of the sculpture is possible. But what is it, that the artwork is hiding, even in this status? This is the unanswered question of “Cradle” by Attile Rajcsók.

photo: Mihály Borsos (misi)
written by: Zsófi Máté

Bolcso (92x56x45 cm, hagesztett acel, 2012)_eng

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bölcső (92x56x45 cm, hagesztett acel, 2012)